[Solved]How does Spiegelman’s tone and style impact you as a reader of the piece? In your opinion, how does irony function in the story? Does anything in the piece stand out to you as ironic? If so, why?

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Let’s have some fun this week for our Wk 2 assignment focusing on style, tone, irony, setting, symbol, and more in Art Spiegelman’s _Maus I_ graphic narrative piece (link in Required and Suggested Readings area of the Classroom).

For your assignment this week, I’d like you to write a full 2-page (500 word minimum) response to the _Maus I_ reading. Your response should be crafted like an essay with introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion.

Consider the following as you think about the piece, and then craft your essay in response to at least two of the questions below:

Did you have to go back and re-read any sections of the graphic narrative for it to make sense to you? If so, which sections, and why? (Consider: was it the narrative, the graphic representation, or both that caused you to have to jump back to catch up?)

How does Spiegelman’s tone and style impact you as a reader of the piece?

In your opinion, how does irony function in the story? Does anything in the piece stand out to you as ironic? If so, why?

Where is the story set, and how does that impact the overall narrative Spiegelman creates for us as readers?

What are the underlying themes you feel Spiegelman is trying to share with readers, and why are they important themes for all of us to understand?

What types of conclusions could you reach about the main characters in the piece, and why are these important to an understanding of human nature?

Use textual evidence when needed to back up your claims. Remember to use proper APA in-text citation if you use words or phrases from the readings, and to include a References citation for each source you use. Consult the APA Resource Center listed in the “Classroom” link in our course menu for helpful documents and resources concerning APA documentation.

This assignment will be checked for plagiarism using our in-course plagiarism detection software. You can read more about the consequences for plagiarism, a form of academic dishonesty, in the Herzing University Academic Dishonesty Policy (in our course syllabus and in the university catalog).
Note that this week we have two required readings and one suggested reading that are supplemental to our Approaching Literature course text. You’ll find these readings attached above for you to download. VERY IMPORTANT: Make sure you right click on the files above and choose “Save As” in order to save the file on your computer. If you simply click to open the file, unfortunately the file will open within the frame of the classroom and you won’t be able to see it all.

Required Readings from Approaching Literature:

“Approaching Critical Theory”

Ch. 7: “Setting and Symbol” and “Tips for Writing about Setting and Symbol.”

Ch. 8: “Style, Tone, and Irony”

Ch. 9: “Writing about Fiction”

Required Supplemental Readings:

McCloud, Scott (1994) “Chapter 1: Setting the Record Straight.” Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art. Harper. pp. 2 – 21. (link above).

Spiegelman, Art (1986). “Chapter 3: Prisoner of War.” Maus 1: A Survivor’s Tale: My Father Bleeds History. Pantheon. pp. 41-69. (link above).

BBC link on timeline of WWII (historical context for Maus I, Ch. 3 — read events of 1939, especially): click here!

Suggested Reading (not required, but recommended):
NPR’s interview with Spiegelman. ‘MetaMaus’: The Story Behind Spiegelman’s Classic: click here!
Chute, Hillary (2008). “Comics as Literature? Reading Graphic Narrative.” PMLA 123.2 pp. 452-465. (link above).

SKU: 9096